The holiday season is here. For most people, the last few weeks of the year are a time to reconnect with family and friends during Hanukkah, Christmas, Kwanzaa, and New Year’s Eve celebrations, among others. However, due to COVID-19, this year’s holiday season will look different for most people. (U.S. Army Graphic by Amber Kurka)
As part of a joint public health working group, DoD public health officials have been working to train service members and civilian employees on how to conduct contact tracing on Oahu to help slow the spread of the virus. 

To help in the fight, Public Health Command-Pacific and Tripler Army Medical Center have been leading the way since the end of April to ensure Army units have trained Soldiers that are ready to respond as contact tracers in the event of a COVID-19 positive case or close contact within their unit. (U.S. Army graphic by Amber Kurka)
Misawa Veterinary Clinic supports military working dogs. (Courtesy)
Thumbnail for Military Work Dog Alma video (Courtesy image)
During the holidays, it’s important to remember that our favorite treats and feasts may pose dangers to our furry family members. Preventing your animals from ingesting dangerous or inappropriate substances is imperative; prevention is always easier (and less dangerous) than treating! (U.S. Army graphic by Amber Kurka)
Observed during the first week of November, One Health Week strives to raise awareness around the world to highlight the need for comprehensive public health using the One Health approach. (Courtesy graphic by U.S. Army Public Health Center)
What One Health Means to Us 2 video introduction image,
(U.S. Army video graphic by Amber Kurka)
What One Health Means to Us 1 video introduction image,
(U.S. Army video graphic by Amber Kurka)
Join us for the Army Public Health Center One Health Webinar Days, One Health in Mobile Populations: Diseases Know No Borders to be held virtually on 3-4 November 2020.  Microsoft CVR Teams is required for attendance.  Follow the link to register and learn more about the event.
https://phc.amedd.army.mil/topics/campaigns/onehealth/Pages/default.aspx 

(Courtesy Graphic
Stop rinsing raw poultry!

Rinsing poultry does not remove bacteria. In fact, it can spread raw juices around your sink, onto your countertops, and onto ready-to-eat foods.

Bacteria in raw meat and poultry can only be killed when cooked to a safe minimum internal temperature, which for poultry is 165 °F, as measured by a food thermometer.
https://www.usda.gov/media/press-releases/2019/08/20/washing-raw-poultry-our-science-your-choice

(U.S. Army Graphic by Amber Kurka)
Lead, pesticides, beryllium, asbestos and other chemicals are accidentally brought home from work on your skin, clothing, shoes and hair and can make family members and pets sick. For more information on how to leave metal and chemical contaminates at work visit:https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/97-125/default.html 

(U.S. Army Graphic by Amber Kurka)
Bacteria can survive freezing temperatures. Freezing is NOT a method for making food safe to eat. When food is thawed, bacteria can still be present and may begin to multiply. 
https://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/safe-food-handling/freezing-and-food-safety/CT_Index 

(U.S. Army Graphic by Amber Kurka)
Returning to work or school may result in separation anxiety for some of our pets that have become accustomed to spending more time with you recently. Learn to recognize the signs and what you can do to help ease the transition for our pets! 
https://www.jbsa.mil/News/News/Article/2299188/covid-stress-how-you-can-help-your-furry-friends-cope/ 

(U.S. Army Graphic by Amber Kurka)
I may be cute but please don’t make me your pet.  

Taking wildlife home to be your pet poses a serious threat to the species being taken and the ecosystems that are depleted. Human health can be severely affected by moving zoonotic pathogens and parasites across the globe.  
https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/15/11/09-0467_article 

(U.S. Army Graphic by Amber Kurka)
Ever wonder what those dates on food products really mean? There are many misconceptions that the date is the exact day in which it is no longer safe to eat. The general rule of thumb is that if it doesn’t look, smell, or taste right, don’t eat it. When in doubt, throw it out!   
http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets


(U.S. Army Graphic by Amber Kurka)
Do you have a kitchen thermometer?  Every well-stocked kitchen needs a thermometer to verify that food has reached a safe minimum internal temperature Most germs are destroyed between 140 and 165 °F.  
 
https://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/wcm/connect/d8151061-bb50-46db-b87e-a3b9022c0c56/Kitchen_Thermometers.pdf?MOD=AJPERES
 
(U.S. Army Graphic by Amber Kurka)
Currently there is no evidence that pets such as dogs or cats can spread COVID-19.  It is always a good idea to wash your hands with soap and water after contact with pets.  This helps to protect you against diseases that can pass between pets and humans.   https://phc.amedd.army.mil/topics/campaigns/covid19/Pages/Pets.aspx   

 
(U.S. Army Graphic by Amber Kurka)
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